Who's Afraid of Religious Liberty?

Seeking to prohibit every kind of “discrimination,” activists in and out of government threaten the free practice of, among other faiths, Judaism.

A rally in support of religious freedom in 2010 in New York. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

A rally in support of religious freedom in 2010 in New York. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Essay
Aug. 1 2016
About the author

Richard Samuelson is associate professor of history at California State University, San Bernardino and a fellow of the Claremont Institute.


Not so long ago, doubts about the ability of Jews to live and practice Judaism freely in the United States would have been dismissed as positively paranoid: relics of a bygone era when American Jews could be turned away from restaurants and country clubs, when restrictive covenants might prevent their purchase of real estate or prejudicial quotas limit their access to universities and corporate offices.

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More about: History & Ideas, Liberalism, Politics & Current Affairs, Religion & Holidays, Religious Freedom