The Prospect for Russia's Jews

Outwardly secure and flourishing, the community is a fraction of its former size and dwindling. What troubles the minds of those who stay?

A synagogue in Birobidjan City, Russia. ANNA YEROSHENKO/AFP/Getty Images.

A synagogue in Birobidjan City, Russia. ANNA YEROSHENKO/AFP/Getty Images.

Essay
March 6 2017
About the author

Maxim D. Shrayer, born in Moscow in 1967, is a professor at Boston College and the author, most recently, of Leaving Russia: A Jewish Story, a National Jewish Book Award finalist. He is also the editor of Dinner with Stalin and Other Stories by his father, David Shrayer-Petrov, a Wallant Award finalist.


“Why do you stay here?”

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Anti-Semitism, History & Ideas, Jewish World, Politics & Current Affairs, Russia, Russian Jewry, The Jewish World