The Two-State Solution Is in Stalemate. Here's What Israel Can Do to Prevail.

For two decades the Jewish state has sought, fruitlessly, to negotiate an end to the conflict. Needed is a new, viable strategy for coping with reality and winning out.

Israeli flags in Jerusalem on April 21, 2015. Yonatan Sindel/Flash90.

Israeli flags in Jerusalem on April 21, 2015. Yonatan Sindel/Flash90.

Essay
Sept. 1 2015
About the author

Evelyn Gordon is a commentator and former legal-affairs reporter who immigrated to Israel in 1987. In addition to Mosaic, she has published in the Jerusalem Post, Azure, Commentary, and elsewhere. She blogs at Evelyn Gordon.


It’s a longstanding truism of international relations that “everyone knows” the solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Yet today, after more than two decades of negotiations under several different Israeli, Palestinian, and American governments have repeatedly failed to produce the two-state agreement whose terms “everyone knows,” it is past time to put this false idea to rest. In fact, what the talks have shown is that even when there’s agreement on general principles, the remaining gaps are insurmountable—and often there isn’t even agreement on principles. What this means is that, for now and for the foreseeable future, a final peace is not achievable.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Politics & Current Affairs