Intermarriage: Can Anything Be Done?

The battle is over; or so we’re told. A half-century after the rate of intermarriage in the US began to skyrocket, the Jewish community appears to have resigned itself to the inevitable. But to declare defeat is preposterous.

Photomontage by Luba Myts. © Mosaic 2013.
Photomontage by Luba Myts. © Mosaic 2013.
Essay
Sept. 3 2013
About the author

Jack Wertheimer, professor of American Jewish history at the Jewish Theological Seminary, is the author of The New American Judaism: How Jews Practice their Religion Today, newly published by Princeton University Press.


The battle is over; or so we’re told. A half-century after the rate of Jewish intermarriage began its rapid ascent in the United States, reaching just under 50 percent by the late 1990s, many communal spokesmen appear to have resigned themselves to the inevitable.

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More about: Intermarriage, Jack Wertheimer, Jewish community, Jewish identity