What Does an Acclaimed Israeli Sci-Fi Writer Have to Tell Us about the Israel of Tomorrow?

Nothing much, and nothing good.

From the cover of Lavie Tidhar’s Central Station. Tachyon.

From the cover of Lavie Tidhar’s Central Station. Tachyon.

Observation
May 26 2016
About the author

Michael Weingrad is professor of Jewish studies at Portland State University and a frequent contributor to Mosaic and the Jewish Review of Books. 


The “central station” in Central Station, a new futuristic novel by the award-winning Israeli science-fiction writer Lavie Tidhar, is a sprawling zone of contrasts: a labyrinthine meeting ground for Jews and Arabs, Asian immigrants and African refugees, criminals and musicians, religious seekers and drug addicts, collectors of local detritus and vendors of knock-off merchandise from distant lands. In other words: pretty much Tel Aviv’s real-life central bus station circa 2016.

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More about: Arts & Culture, Literature, Religion & Zionism, Science fiction