The Daring Strugatsky Brothers, Practitioners of Outwardly Soviet, Covertly Jewish Science Fiction

Deified by their Soviet readers, Arkady and Boris Strugatsky are beginning to find increasing numbers of readers in America.

The jacket of the Russian edition of Monday Starts on Saturday by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. Wikipedia.

The jacket of the Russian edition of Monday Starts on Saturday by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. Wikipedia.

Observation
March 22 2018
About the author

Marat Grinberg is professor of Russian and comparative literature at Reed College. His essays and reviews have appeared in the LA Review of Books, Tablet, Cineaste, and Commentary.


Deified by their Soviet readers from the 1960s on, the Strugatsky brothers—Arkady (1925-1991) and his younger sibling Boris (1933-2012)—were not only the most popular and prolific Russian writers of science fiction, a highly respected genre in post-Stalinist Soviet culture, but its most daring practitioners. Translated widely during the cold war, their work was continually on the radar of American science-fiction writers from Isaac Asimov to Ursula Le Guin to Kim Stanley Robinson.

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More about: Arts & Culture, Literature, Russian Jewry, Science fiction, Soviet Union