Why There Was Never an Italian "Yiddish" (and Why There Will Never Be an American One)

An Italian Yiddish was never in the cards, as the case of “Judeo-Mantuan” makes clear, because Jews were more closely integrated into Italian society than they were in Eastern Europe.

A Jewish wedding painted by Marco Marcuola, Venice, around 1780. Wikipedia.

A Jewish wedding painted by Marco Marcuola, Venice, around 1780. Wikipedia.

Observation
March 4 2020
About the author

Philologos, the renowned Jewish-language columnist, appears twice a month in Mosaic. Questions for him may be sent to his email address by clicking here.


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More about: Arts & Culture, History & Ideas, Italian Jewry, Jewish language