Nothing Like It in 3,000 Years of Jewish Literature

The second Hebrew novelist was the first to imagine the pageantry and passion of life in ancient Israel—and thereby excited the dreams of emergent Zionists.

A tree at Masada. Karen Chan/Flickr.

A tree at Masada. Karen Chan/Flickr.

Observation
Sept. 30 2015
About the author

Hillel Halkin’s books include Yehuda HaleviAcross the Sabbath RiverMelisande: What are Dreams? (a novel), Jabotinsky: A Life (2014), and, most recently, After One-Hundred-and-Twenty (Princeton). 


This essay is the second in a series of fresh looks by Hillel Halkin at East European Zionist or proto-Zionist writers and intellectuals of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The first, on the Galician Hebrew writer Joseph Perl, is available here.

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More about: Arts & Culture, East European Jewry, Hebrew literature, History & Ideas, Proto-Zionist Writers