Oslo on My Mind

Memories of the day, twenty-two years ago, when the Oslo Accords were signed—and of the price Israel paid for that “terrible mistake.”

Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Rabin with their Nobel Peace Prizes in Oslo in 1994. Wikipedia.

Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Rabin with their Nobel Peace Prizes in Oslo in 1994. Wikipedia.

Observation
Sept. 10 2015
About the author

Ruth R. Wisse is a research professor at Harvard and a distinguished senior fellow at the Tikvah Fund. Her most recent book is No Joke: Making Jewish Humor (2013, paperback 2015).


As happens every year at this time, I can’t help dwelling on the events of the day, twenty-two years ago, when the Oslo Accords were signed by Yitzhak Rabin, prime minister of the state of Israel, and the PLO chieftain Yasir Arafat, thereafter to be known as president of the new Palestinian Authority. This year, my memories of September 13, 1993 have been triggered by a passage in Ally, Michael Oren’s recently published account of his term as Israel’s ambassador to the United States between 2009 and 2013.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Michael Oren, Oslo Accords, Peace Process