The Fantasy of an International Jerusalem

One-hundred years ago, over a lunch, the internationalization of Jerusalem became irrelevant—and it remains so.

A Franciscan monk reading in French British General Edmund Allenby’s famous proclamation announcing British rule over Jerusalem on December 11, 1917. Library of Congress

A Franciscan monk reading in French British General Edmund Allenby’s famous proclamation announcing British rule over Jerusalem on December 11, 1917. Library of Congress

Observation
Dec. 28 2017
About the author

Martin Kramer teaches Middle Eastern history and served as founding president at Shalem College in Jerusalem, and is the Koret distinguished fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.


In the uproar over President Trump’s announcement of U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, one constant refrain has been the insistence that, by longstanding international consensus, the city’s status has yet to be decided. In the portentous words of the recent UN General Assembly resolution protesting the American action, “Jerusalem is a final-status issue to be resolved through negotiations in line with relevant United Nations resolutions.”

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More about: History & Ideas, Israel & Zionism, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Jerusalem, Peace Process