The Other Other L. Strauss

Meet Lewis (not Levi, and not Leo) Strauss, the now-forgotten American Jew who helped German Jews escape the Nazis, played a key role in developing nuclear weapons, and more.

Time magazine’s Sep. 21, 1953 cover featuring Lewis Strauss. 

Time magazine’s Sep. 21, 1953 cover featuring Lewis Strauss. 

Observation
Jan. 10 2018
About the author

Allan Arkush is the senior contributing editor of the Jewish Review of Books and professor of Judaic studies and history at Binghamton University.

In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the ambitiously named Foundation for Religious Action in the Social and Civil Order. Its purpose: to “unite all believers in God in the struggle between the free world and atheistic Communism.” Writing about the conferences held by this foundation, Frances FitzGerald in her recent book The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America notes that among those giving “speeches on the spiritual factors in the anti-Communist struggle” were not only “Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish clergymen” but also “pious national-security officials such as Leo Strauss, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.”

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: American Judaism, EIsenhower, History & Ideas, Israel & Zionism