Self-Portrait of a Zionist Statesman and Thinker

As his new memoir brings home, Moshe Arens is one of the most accomplished, articulate, and clear-eyed figures in Israel’s history. What a pity that his best ideas were often thwarted.

Moshe Arens (left), with Ariel Sharon, David Levy, and Yitzhak Shamir on February 10, 1992 in Israel. Esaias BAITEL/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images.

Moshe Arens (left), with Ariel Sharon, David Levy, and Yitzhak Shamir on February 10, 1992 in Israel. Esaias BAITEL/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images.

Observation
March 28 2018
About the author

Neil Rogachevsky teaches at the Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University.


Two major political parties in Israel still bear the names “Labor” and “Likud,” but the contending ideologies that fueled their founding—and animated the venomous quarrels between them—seem to be fading away. Where Labor is concerned, union membership continues to plummet, biting into the party’s natural constituency, and voters have continued to blame it for the failures of the Oslo Accords and the long years of Palestinian violence that ensued from them.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Likud, Moshe Arens