After Seventy Years, Israeli Judaism Is Settling In and Getting Comfortable

The famous “new Jew” of Zionist lore is finally here: a dynamic blend of modern and traditionalist, nationalist and cosmopolitan. So an ambitious new book argues.

Young Israeli Jews sing at a Havdalah ceremony in Tel Aviv on October 24, 2015. Miriam Alster/FLASH90.

Young Israeli Jews sing at a Havdalah ceremony in Tel Aviv on October 24, 2015. Miriam Alster/FLASH90.

Observation
July 10 2019
About the author

Ari Hoffman, a student at Stanford Law School, holds a Ph.D. in English literature from Harvard and writes widely on literature, politics, and culture. His first book, This Year in Jerusalem: The Israel Novel and Why it Matters, is forthcoming from SUNY Press.


What has Zionism achieved? Like all revolutionaries, the early Zionists understood that in the new world they intended to create, a new kind of person would be required—in their case, a new kind of Jew, one not only speaking a new-old language in a new-old land but forging, or re-forging, a new-old identity.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Judaism in Israel