The Rise and Prospects of Israeli Conservatism

By a number of measures Israeli sensibilities have always been fairly conservative, but conservatism as an ideology was long frowned upon—until recently. What’s next?





Supreme Court President Esther Hayut and other Supreme Court justices arrive for a hearing at the Supreme Court in Jerusalem on June 3, 2018. Yonatan Sindel/Flash90.
Observation
Jan. 2 2020
About the author

Moshe Koppel is a member of the department of computer science at Bar-Ilan University and chairman of the Kohelet Policy Forum in Jerusalem.


For more than a half-century, public debate in Israel has been dominated by two large sets of issues: externally, how to work for peace while maintaining maximum security; domestically, how to navigate the relationship between religion and state. But when it came to social and economic policy, debate gave way to across-the-board consensus: for decades, it was taken largely for granted that welfare-state economics and heavy government regulation made up the sine qua non of the good society.

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More about: Conservatism, Economics, Israel & Zionism, Israeli economy