Did the San Remo Conference Advance or Undermine the Prospects for a Jewish State?

As a Jew, I wish that the resolution signed 100 years ago had been what today’s celebrants claim it was. As a historian of Israel, I must report that it was much less.

Prime Minister Lloyd George and Earl Curzon of the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Alexander Millerand of France, and Prime Minister Francesco Nitti of Italy at the League of Nations Peace Treaty Conference in San Remo on May 13, 1920. Getty.

Prime Minister Lloyd George and Earl Curzon of the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Alexander Millerand of France, and Prime Minister Francesco Nitti of Italy at the League of Nations Peace Treaty Conference in San Remo on May 13, 1920. Getty.

Observation
Dec. 1 2020
About the author

Martin Kramer teaches Middle Eastern history and served as founding president at Shalem College in Jerusalem, and is the Walter P. Stern fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.


Three years ago this month, Israel marked not one but two major anniversaries: the centennial of the Balfour Declaration, announcing British support for a Jewish national home in Palestine (November 2, 1917), and 70 years since the UN General Assembly partition resolution calling for separate Jewish and Arab states in Palestine (November 29, 1947). Both are widely recognized as landmarks on the road to Israeli independence.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Treaty of San Remo