"A Lot of People Want Malmö to Fail, Just as They Want Salahuddin and Me to Hate Each Other"

A visit with an imam and a rabbi who together are attempting the impossible in Sweden’s most notoriously anti-Semitic city.

Imam Salahuddin Barakat and Rabbi Moshe David HaCohen in the Swedish city of Malmö. Annika Hernroth-Rothstein.

Imam Salahuddin Barakat and Rabbi Moshe David HaCohen in the Swedish city of Malmö. Annika Hernroth-Rothstein.

Observation
Jan. 21 2020
About the author

Annika Hernroth-Rothstein is a syndicated columnist for Israel Hayom and a frequent contributor to the Washington Examiner. 

 


A few weeks ago, I found myself sitting in the home of Imam Salahuddin Barakat in the Swedish city of Malmö. I’ve just met him for the first time; but his other guest, Rabbi Moshe David HaCohen, is a regular here. As the imam serves Arabic coffee and kosher cinnamon buns, I adjust my camera and the rabbi, with a notable air of familiarity, makes himself at home on the couch.

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More about: Islam, Jewish-Muslim Relations, Politics & Current Affairs, Sweden, The Jewish World