What Has Happened to the Jews of Ukraine

Caught in the middle of Russia’s hybrid war on their country, they need serious help—and nobody is listening.

Asher Cherkassky, a Ukrainian Orthodox Jew who joined a pro-Ukrainian volunteer battalion, in southern Ukraine in November 2015. ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images.

Asher Cherkassky, a Ukrainian Orthodox Jew who joined a pro-Ukrainian volunteer battalion, in southern Ukraine in November 2015. ANATOLII STEPANOV/AFP via Getty Images.

Observation
Jan. 7 2020
About the author

Dovid Margolin is an associate editor at Chabad.org, where he writes on Jewish life around the world, with a particular interest in Russian Jewish history.


In early 2014, political disruption in Ukraine devolved into unrest, a Russian invasion of the country, and a war that is still not over. Yet today, almost six years later—and despite a phone call between the U.S. president and his Ukrainian counterpart that dominated the American news cycle for weeks—even those who closely follow international events remain, for the most part, in the dark about Ukraine’s overall present situation, its history—or, in particular, the condition of its Jews.

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More about: Anti-Semitism, Politics & Current Affairs, Putin, Russia, Ukraine