What's Happened with British Jews Since Corbyn's Defeat?

It’s been one year since the anti-Semitic Labor leader stepped down. Things have much improved since then, but it’s also become clear that the forces he unleashed are in the U.K. to stay.

Then-MP Keir Starmer with then-British Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn on March 21, 2019 in Belgium. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images.

Then-MP Keir Starmer with then-British Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn on March 21, 2019 in Belgium. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images.

Observation
March 18 2021
About the author

Tamara Berens is a Krauthammer fellow at Mosaic.


Britain’s 260,000 or so Jews breathed a collective sigh of relief in December 2019 when Jeremy Corbyn, at the time the leader of the Labor party, suffered a decisive electoral defeat to now-prime minister Boris Johnson. For four years, the Jewish community had been tormented by Corbyn’s simultaneous encouragement and covering-up of rampant anti-Semitism in Labor and left-wing politics. As I wrote then, while anti-Semitism has long been an issue in the UK, it was under Corbyn’s leadership that it became an electoral strategy. Under him, as few as 7 percent of Jews were thought to vote for Labor in 2019, down from an even split between Labor and the Conservatives, according to a study from the Jewish Policy Institute nine years prior.

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More about: Anti-Semitism, British Jewry, Jeremy Corbyn, Labor Party (UK), Politics & Current Affairs, United Kingdom