Is Europe’s Far Right Serious about Rethinking Its Attitude toward Judaism?

A shift in right-wing populist rhetoric toward Jews and Israel has been taking place on the continent. Why? And how likely is it to endure?

Marine Le Pen, president of the French far-right Front National party, in Paris on March 28, 2018, during a silent march in memory of Mireille Knoll, an 85-year-old Jewish woman murdered in her home in an anti-Semitic attack. FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP via Getty Images.

Marine Le Pen, president of the French far-right Front National party, in Paris on March 28, 2018, during a silent march in memory of Mireille Knoll, an 85-year-old Jewish woman murdered in her home in an anti-Semitic attack. FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP via Getty Images.

Observation
April 12 2021
About the author

Tobias Cremer is a Junior Research Fellow in Religion and the Frontier Challenges at Pembroke College, University of Oxford.

“The AfD is thoroughly pro-Jewish. . . . In parliament, we are constantly introducing pro-Jewish motions.”—Jörg Meuthen, president of the German political party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), 2018.

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More about: Alt-Right, Europe, European Jewry, Politics & Current Affairs, Populism