Rembrandt's Jewish Vision

If Judaism’s idea of art is one that can truly represent our frail, fallible humanity, then Rembrandt, who captured faces “without any attempt to beautify them,” is the artist for Jews.

From Rembrandt’s Self-portrait with Beret, 1655. Wikimedia.

From Rembrandt’s Self-portrait with Beret, 1655. Wikimedia.

Observation
Sept. 14 2017
About the author

Meir Soloveichik is the rabbi of Congregation Shearith Israel in New York and director of the Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University.

With this, we launch an occasional series of essays by Rabbi Meir Soloveichik on the intersection of Jews and Judaism with the artistic practice, and the aesthetic vision, of the great 17th-century Dutch master. “Rembrandt’s Light,” immediately below, introduces the series, and is followed by the first essay, “What Happened at Mount Moriah: Rembrandt and the Binding of Isaac.”

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More about: Abraham, Arts & Culture, Binding of Isaac, Isaac, Religion & Holidays, Rembrandt, Rembrandt and the Jews