The British Left's Jewish Problem

How anti-Zionism, and something worse, has been brought into the mainstream of the British Labor party—and seems to be there to stay.

Labor Party (UK) leader Jeremy Corbyn at an inquiry into party anti-Semitism in London on June 30, 2016. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images.

Labor Party (UK) leader Jeremy Corbyn at an inquiry into party anti-Semitism in London on June 30, 2016. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images.

Observation
Nov. 10 2016
About the author

Liam Hoare is a freelance writer whose work on politics and literature has featured in The Atlantic, The Forward, and The Jewish Chronicle. He is a graduate of University College London’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies.

British politics, and British Jewry in particular, received a shock in 2015 when Jeremy Corbyn won the contest to become leader of the Labor party, a position he retains despite a dramatic attempt to oust him this past September—a so-called coup that turned out to be a total bust. It was a noble effort, to be sure, by the center-left establishment to rid itself of the unreconstructed old-style socialist representing what everyone thought to be the party’s far-left fringe, thankfully long suppressed. This time, however, Corbyn not only won but was reconfirmed in power with a greater majority. As for British Jews, who for some time have been feeling uncomfortable about the direction in which Labor has been headed, this re-election does nothing to halt their gradual drift toward voting Conservative.

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More about: Jeremy Corbyn, Labor Party (UK), United Kingdom