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The Desecration of Jewish Cemeteries: Serious, But Not New

March 28 2017

Over the past few months, there have been at least three incidents of vandalism of Jewish burial grounds in the U.S.; these have coincided with the series of bomb threats (all hoaxes) against Jewish communal institutions. Senator Bernie Sanders, Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti-Defamation League, and New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio, along with countless journalists, have placed the blame squarely on the shoulders of Donald Trump. But the truth is that anti-Semites have a long history of striking at dead Jews, especially when live Jews are unavailable or sufficiently protected. Seth Mandel comments:

Nowhere is [the prevalence of this form of vandalism] illustrated more clearly than at Jerusalem’s Mount of Olives cemetery. Constructed 3,000 years ago, it contains tens of thousands of burial plots, including those for great rabbis and Jewish figures over the centuries. When Jordan took control of that area of Jerusalem during Israel’s War of Independence, it commenced desecrating every Jewish holy site it could find, very much including the Mount of Olives cemetery, using the stones for construction. Israel won the territory back in 1967, but the cemetery has consistently been the target of vandalism up to the present day. New security measures seem finally to be working; in late February the Forward reported that the cemetery was “free of vandalism for the first time in decades.”

All of which makes what’s happening now in the United States so disturbing, for two reasons. First, it’s not new. Second, it’s being treated as if it is. . . .

In [2008], Jewish graves in France, Hungary, Latvia, and Greece were hit. In 2011, cemeteries in New Jersey and Kosovo were hit. In 2012, Jewish cemeteries in France, Germany, Austria, Ukraine, Hungary, Poland, Canada, and New Zealand were vandalized, as well as the graves of Jewish war veterans in Florida. In 2013, it was Arizona’s turn. In 2014, Wisconsin and Massachusetts saw vandalism at Jewish graves, as did Hungary, Greece, England, and Norway. And these are just the ones that make the news. But . . . many don’t.

Attacks of this sort didn’t start in 2015, when Donald Trump decided to run for president. . . . Candidate Trump’s response to [the] outpouring of hate on his behalf was never better than insufficient, and often worse. But there was nothing linking Trump to any of the cemetery desecrations around the world in 2015, or the one that hit Philadelphia’s Adath Jeshurun in July of that year. Yet this year, when another Philadelphia Jewish cemetery was hit, and despite the fact that no arrests had been made as of this writing, it was viewed differently—not only because it came after another such incident in Missouri and amid the JCC bomb threats, but because the media framed the attack specifically in [in the context of Trump’s presidency].

Read more at Commentary

More about: ADL, American Jewry, American politics, Anti-Semitism, Donald Trump, Jewish cemeteries, Jewish World

Israel’s Economy Thrives While the Middle East Disintegrates

Jan. 19 2018

Now that the data have come in from 2017, it is clear that the Israeli economy had another successful year, expanding at a rate higher than that of any other advanced country. Israel’s per-capita GDP also grew, placing it above those of France and Japan. Daniel Kryger notes some of the implications regarding the Jewish state’s place in the Middle East:

The contrast between first-world Israel and the surrounding third-world Arab states is larger today than ever before. Israel’s GDP per capita is almost twenty times the GDP per capita of impoverished Egypt and five times larger than semi-developed Lebanon.

Like any human project, Israel is a never-ending work in progress and much work remains to integrate ḥaredi Jews and Israeli Arabs into Israel’s knowledge economy. Properly addressing Israel’s high costs of living requires more economic and legislative reforms and breaking up inefficient oligopolies that keep the prices artificially high. However, by any standard, the reborn Jewish state is a remarkable success story. . . .

Much has changed since OPEC launched its oil embargo against the West after the failed Arab aggression against Israel in October 1973. Before the collapse of the pro-Arab Soviet empire, China and India had no official ties with Israel and many Western and Japanese companies avoided doing business with Israel. Collapsing oil prices have dramatically eroded the power of oil-producing countries. It has become obvious that the future belongs to those who innovate, not those who happen to sit on oil. Israel has today strong commercial ties with China and a thriving partnership with India. Business delegations from Jamaica to Japan are eager to do business with Israel and benefit from Israel’s expertise. . . .

[For its part], the boycott, divest, and sanction (BDS) movement may bully Jewish and pro-Israel students on Western campuses. However, in real life, BDS stands no chance of succeeding against Israel. The reason is simple: reborn Israel has . . . become too valuable a player in the global economy.

Read more at Mida

More about: BDS, Israel & Zionism, Israeli economy, Middle East, OPEC