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Valerie Plame’s Circulation of an Anti-Semitic Article Was Deliberate

Sept. 25 2017

On Thursday Valerie Plame, a former CIA officer, sent a tweet reading “America’s Jews Are Driving America’s Wars,” followed by a link to an article with that title by one Philip Giraldi, who regularly writes on the theme of malign Jewish influence on U.S. foreign policy, usually for far-right websites. The article asserts that Jews should recuse themselves from positions in government in which they might influence policy, and Jewish pundits should be identified by their religion when appearing on television. After receiving much criticism, she apologized. Alan Dershowitz writes:

The article [in question] contains the usual anti-Semitic tropes: Jews are guilty of dual loyalty; they control politicians, the media and entertainment; they want the U.S. to fight wars for the country to which they have real allegiance—Israel; they are dangerous to America. . . . This was not the first time Plame retweeted Giraldi’s garbage. [In her initial response to criticism of the article, before backing down and apologizing], she described it as: “Yes, very provocative, but thoughtful. Many neocon hawks ARE Jewish. Ugh.”

Nor is this the only time that Plame has tweeted other nonsense from the bigoted platform this piece came from. I actually read the Philip Giraldi article—before I was aware of the Plame tweet—on a neo-Nazi website, where Giraldi’s articles are frequently featured. For Plame to claim that she was unaware of the anti-Semitic content of Giraldi’s article is to ignore reality. Plame had to be aware, since she was aware of Giraldi’s bigotry. Her apologies ring hollow. . . .

The Plame incident reflects a broader problem. . . . There is a growing tolerance for anti-Semitism. Even when some people themselves do not harbor these feelings, they are willing to support those who do, as long as the anti-Semites are on their side of the political spectrum. . . .

The problem exists both on the hard right and the hard left. Both extremes see the world in racial, ethnic, and religious terms. Both engage in identity politics: the hard left gives more weight to the views of certain minorities; while the hard right gives less weight to the views of these same minorities. . . .

What the hard right and hard left share . . . is bigotry toward Jews: the neo-Nazi right hates the Jewish people, and the hard left hates the nation-state of the Jewish people and those Jews who support it. Both views are bigoted and must not become acceptable among centrist liberals and conservatives.

Read more at Fox News

More about: American politics, Anti-Semitism, Politics & Current Affairs

Hamas Sets Its Sights on Taking over the PLO

Oct. 20 2017

Examining the recent reconciliation agreement between the rival Palestinian organizations Fatah and Hamas, Eyal Zisser argues that the latter sees the deal as a way to install its former leader, Khaled Meshal, as head of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and thereby the Palestinian Authority. It wouldn’t be the first time something like this happened:

Even the former Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat . . . took the PLO leadership by force. His first steps, incidentally, were with the Fatah organization, which he cofounded in January 1965 in Damascus, under Syrian patronage. Fatah was meant to serve as a counterweight to the rival PLO, which had come into existence [earlier] under Egyptian patronage. Arafat, however, was relegated to the sidelines in the Palestinian arena. It was only after the 1967 Six-Day War that he exploited the resounding defeat of the Arab armies to join the PLO as the leader of Fatah, which led to his gaining control over [the PLO itself].

Meshal [most likely] wants to follow in Arafat’s footsteps—a necessary maneuver for a man who aspires to lead the Palestinian national movement, particularly after realizing that military might and even a hostile takeover of [either Gaza or the West Bank] will not grant him the legitimacy he craves.

It is hard to believe that Fatah will willingly hand over the keys to leadership, and it is also safe to assume that Egypt does not want to see Hamas grow stronger. But quasi-democratic developments such as these have their own dynamics. In 2006, Israel was persuaded by Washington to allow Hamas to run in the general Palestinian elections, thinking the Islamist group had no chance of winning. But Hamas won those elections. We can assume Meshal will now look to repeat that political ploy by joining the PLO and vying for its leadership.

Read more at Israel Hayom

More about: Fatah, Hamas, Khaled Meshal, Palestinian Authority, PLO, Politics & Current Affairs, Yasir Arafat