The Recent Bombings in Sweden Highlight Europe’s Immigration Crisis

Jan. 29 2018

Last week, an explosive device went off in the Swedish city of Malmo—which has also been the location of many anti-Semitic incidents in recent years—and a police station was bombed in the same neighborhood the week before. Nobody was hurt in either instance, but, Sohrab Ahmari points out, if similar instances since October are added to the tally, Malmo has a frequency of bombings that puts it “in the same category as Mogadishu and Quetta.” And this is only part of a larger problem:

Long known for its tolerance and quality of life, [Sweden] has lately seen an alarming rise in gang violence, sexual assault, and terrorism—most of it linked to a large and unassimilated Muslim minority. There were more than 320 shootings and at least 110 murders in Sweden in 2017. . . . Rapes in 2017 were up 10 percent over the previous year, for a total of 7,226. . . .

There is no getting around the connections between Sweden’s crime wave and the country’s immigration-and-assimilation failures. . . . And yet its government, which likes to tout itself as the world’s “humanitarian superpower,” continues to extend an open-door invitation at a time when voters have run out of patience. Don’t be surprised if that frustration translates into significant ballot-box gains for the hard-right, neo-Nazi-linked Sweden Democrats come September’s parliamentary elections. When the responsible parties fail to deal with reality as it is, voters will turn to irresponsible ones.

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More about: Europe, European Islam, Immigration, Politics & Current Affairs, Sweden

No, Israel Hasn’t Used Disproportionate Force against Hamas

Aug. 15 2018

Last week, Hamas and other terrorist organizations in Gaza launched nearly 200 rockets and mortars into Israel, in addition to the ongoing makeshift incendiary devices and sporadic sniper fire. Israel responded with an intensive round of airstrikes, which stopped the rockets. Typically, condemnations of the Jewish state’s use of “disproportionate force” followed; and typically, as Peter Lerner, a former IDF spokesman, explains, these were wholly inaccurate:

The IDF conducted, by its own admission, approximately 180 precision strikes. In the aftermath of those strikes the Hamas Ministry of Health announced that three people had been killed. One of the dead was [identified] as a Hamas terrorist. The two others were reported as civilians: Inas Abu Khmash, a twenty-three-year-old pregnant woman, and her eighteen-month daughter, Bayan. While their deaths are tragic, they are not an indication of a disproportionate response to Hamas’s bombardment of Israel’s southern communities. With . . . 28 Israelis who required medical assistance [and] 30 Iron Dome interceptions, I would argue the heart-rending Palestinian deaths indicate the exact opposite.

The precision strikes on Hamas’s assets with so few deaths show how deep and thorough is the planning process the IDF has put in place. . . . Proportionality in warfare, [however], is not a numbers game, as so many of the journalists I’ve worked with maintain. . . . Proportionality weighs the necessity of a military action against the anguish that the action might cause to civilians in the vicinity. . . . In the case of the last few days, it appears that even intended combatant deaths were [deemed] undesirable, due to their potential to increase the chances of war. . . .

The question that should be repeated is why indiscriminate rocket fire against Israeli civilians from behind Gazan civilians is accepted, underreported, and not condemned.

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More about: Gaza Strip, Hamas, IDF, Israel & Zionism, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict