Donate

A Biblical Case for Ending the Israeli Chief Rabbinate’s Monopoly on Kosher Supervision

For most of Israel’s history, the chief rabbinate has held a government-enforced monopoly on certifying that restaurants and other places where food is produced are kosher. But, largely in response to allegations of corruption and favoritism on the part of the chief rabbinate and its approved supervisors, a number of rabbis have begun granting kashrut certification outside the official system. Now Tzohar—an Orthodox organization founded to challenge the chief rabbinate’s positions on marriage and divorce—has joined in this effort.

Eliezer Melamed, an influential rabbi and no one’s idea of a religious liberal, defends Tzohar’s efforts by appealing to traditional texts to argue that halakhah admits, and in fact encourages, a sort of federalism. Thus the council of elders Moses convenes in Numbers 11—traditionally understood as the precursor to the Sanhedrin, or supreme rabbinic council—is a representative body, with elders drawn from each tribe. And just as, in ancient Israel, different tribes were autonomous units that operated their own rabbinic courts, so, too, Melamed argues, different segments of Israeli society—the modern equivalent of tribes—should be allowed their own rabbinic authorities. He explains:

“Appoint yourselves judges and officers for your tribes in all your settlements that God your Lord is giving you, and make sure that they administer honest judgment for the people,” [commands] Deuteronomy 16:18. The sages say in [both] the Jerusalem and Babylonian Talmuds, “It is a mitzvah for every tribe to judge its own tribe” (Makkot 1:8 and Sanhedrin 16b, respectively). According to the reading of Moses Naḥmanides (ca. 1194-1270), it’s possible there may even have been a commandment to appoint a high court or Sanhedrin for each and every tribe with certain powers over members of that tribe. . . .

Today, the [Jewish] nation is divided into ethnic groups [e.g., Ashkenazim, Sephardim, Mizraḥim, etc.] and circles united by ideology [e.g., secular Jews, religious Zionists, Ḥasidim, etc.]. . . . Torah scholars of one sector or group must not disqualify the scholars of another, so long as they are loyal to the Torah and its commandments. And even if a sector’s halakhic opinion is unacceptable to the majority, it is forbidden to disqualify their position regarding what they rule in their own communities, . . . and their opinions must be considered [in discussions of jurisprudence]. . . .

[W]hen groups and institutions try to impose their opinion on members of another circle, and attempt to deny the authority of their rabbis and prevent them from serving as rabbinical judges or in other positions controlled by chief rabbinate, [as has happened in several instances], we are no longer speaking of a situation where the rabbis of Tzohar may establish a kashrut organization, but rather a situation in which it is almost obligatory for them to establish one . . . in order to give . . . expression to their portion in the Torah.

Read more at Israel National News

More about: Halakhah, Hebrew Bible, Israel & Zionism, Israeli Chief Rabbinate, Judaism in Israel, Kashrut, Religion & Holidays

America Is Right to Withdraw from the UN Human Rights Council

June 21 2018

Yesterday the U.S. announced its decision to withdraw from the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), which serves primarily as a forum for the worst human-rights abusers to condemn Israel while ignoring the atrocious behavior of tyrants. Anne Bayefsky writes:

Among the 47 UN states calling the shots on the organization’s top human-rights body are such human-rights paragons as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, . . . Qatar, and Venezuela. . . .

There is no doubt that the UN Human Rights Council is a productive tool for anti-Semites. Discrimination against the Jewish state is baked into its procedures . . . as well as its composition. The council reserves one permanent agenda item for every one of its regular sessions solely for condemning Israel. All other 192 UN member states are considered together under a separate item, if they are discussed at all.

The council has adopted more resolutions condemning Israel than any other country on earth, and nothing condemning almost 90 percent of the world’s states. The council has held more emergency special sessions on Israel than on any other country, including Syria—where at least 500,000 have died and up to 12 million have been displaced.

But even beyond the disturbing fact that anti-Semitism thrives at the United Nations under the guise of human rights is that the “human-rights” experts, the nongovernmental organizations and the academic entourage surrounding this whole apparatus, have the council’s back. For months, they have been flooding the airwaves and [the American ambassador to the UN Nikki] Haley and [Secretary of State Mike] Pompeo’s email inboxes begging the Trump administration to stay on the council. In a nutshell, they make one basic point: the demonization of Israel, even if undeserved, is peripheral to the common good. Pompeo and Haley have courageously decided to set them straight. Equal rights cannot be built on inequality for Jews and the Jewish state.

Read more at Fox News

More about: Israel & Zionism, U.S. Foreign policy, UNHRC, United Nations