The Women’s March Has an Anti-Semitism Problem

On Sunday, the Nation of Islam’s leader Louis Farrakhan was visiting Iran, where he led a chant of “Death to America!” and “Death to Israel!” He has also been praised repeatedly by two of the leaders of the Women’s March, which was organized in 2016 to protest Donald Trump’s election and scheduled to occur a third time in January. And admiration of Farrakhan, writes Karol Markowicz, is but one sign of the organization’s problem with Jews:

Linda Sarsour, one of the [march’s] leaders, . . . supported the radical Muslim Brotherhood, [parent organization of Hamas]. In 2012, she tweeted: “When we write the history of Islam in America, the Nation of #Islam is an integral part of that history.” . . .

People change, goes the argument, and Sarsour made these comments several years ago, before she became a high-profile political figure on the left. Perhaps she’s more responsible now. But in September, Sarsour said American Muslims shouldn’t “humanize” Israelis. There was no overwhelming response from the left to remind her that Israelis are actually human. American Jews who ignore this hatred are fooling themselves. Anti-Semitism is specifically about dehumanizing Jews until their murder makes sense. . . .

Then there’s the Women’s March co-president Tamika Mallory. In a February 2018 speech, Farrakhan said, [that he], “by God’s grace, has pulled the cover off of that Satanic Jew, and I’m here to say your time is up, your world is through.” Mallory attended the speech. She once posted a picture of herself embraced by Farrakhan, referring to him as “the GOAT” (Greatest of All Time). Just last May, Mallory praised the “bravery” of Hamas terrorists. So when she pointedly refused to condemn Farrakhan’s anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT comments after being asked, it was no surprise. . . . .

And note: while “Black women, Native women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women, [and] lesbian, queer, and trans women” are all specifically mentioned in the [march’s] “Unity Principles,” Jewish women are not. Meanwhile, anti-Semitic attacks account for more than half of all hate crimes in the U.S. Maybe it’s not a coincidence.

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Why Israel Pretends That Hamas Fired Rockets by Accident

March 21 2019

Israeli military and political officials have repeated Hamas’s dubious claim that the launching of two rockets at Tel Aviv last week was inadvertent. To Smadar Perry, accepting Hamas’s story rather than engaging in further retaliation is but a convenient, and perhaps necessary, way of aiding Egyptian efforts to broker a deal with the terrorist group. But even if these efforts succeed, the results will be mixed:

The [Israeli] security cabinet has met in Tel Aviv and decided that they would continue indirect negotiations with Gaza. A message was sent to Egypt, whose delegation is going back to Gaza to pass on the Israeli demands for calm. The Egyptians also have to deal with the demands from Hamas, which include, among other things, an increase in aid from $15 million to $30 million per month and an increase in the supply of electricity.

The requests are reasonable, but they do leave a sour taste in the mouth. Israel must ensure that this financial aid does not end up in the pockets of Hamas and its associates. [Israel] also knows that if it says “no” to everything, the Iranians will step in, with the help of their Gazan friends in Islamic Jihad. They are just waiting for the opportunity.

Hamas also must deal with the fallout from a series of massive handouts from Qatar. For when the citizens of the Gaza Strip saw that the money was going to the Hamas leadership, who were also enjoying a fine supply of electricity to their own houses, they took to the streets in protest—and this time it was not Israel that was the focus of their anger. . .

[But] here is the irony. With Egyptian help, Israel can reach understandings for calm with Gaza, despite the lack of a direct channel. . . . In the West Bank, where the purportedly friendlier Fatah is in charge, it is more complicated, at least until the eighty-three-year-old Mahmoud Abbas is replaced.

As evidence for that last statement, consider the murder of two Israelis in the West Bank on Sunday, and the Palestinians who threw explosives at Israeli soldiers at Joseph’s Tomb in Shechem yesterday.

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