A Hebrew Novel in Which a Mésalliance Serves as a Metaphor for the Jewish Condition in 20th-Century Europe

First published in 1929, and groundbreaking for its supple Hebrew style, David Fogel’s Married Life has as its protagonist Rudolf Gurdweill, a would-be writer who attends regular gatherings at a café with a circle of Jewish friends. At one such meeting he notices, and then approaches, the statuesque and evidently Gentile Baroness Thea von Tokow; they agree to marry before the evening is over. Dara Horn describes what happens next:

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Read more at Tablet

More about: Anti-Semitism, Arts & Culture, Austrian Jewry, Hebrew literature, Jewish literature, Vienna

Thoughts on Yitzhak Rabin’s Assassination, a Quarter-Century On

On the Jewish calendar, today is the 25th anniversary of Prime Minister Yitzḥak Rabin’s assassination at the hands of a fellow Jewish Israeli. Rabin, after a long and impressive career in the military and in politics, had not long beforehand signed the Oslo Accords, and was murdered by a zealous opponent of that decision. Reflecting on the occasion, David Horovitz writes:

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Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Israeli politics, Oslo Accords, Yitzhak Rabin