Jewish Fate and the Soviet-Jewish “Madam Bovary”

Arrested in 1949 on charges of “anti-Soviet crimes,” the great Yiddish author Dovid Bergelson was sentenced to death and executed by firing squad in 1952. Bergelson had fled the Soviet Union in 1921 for exile in Berlin, but in 1926 began to take a more pro-Soviet stance, arguing that the USSR was the best place for Yiddish culture to flourish, and he moved to Moscow in 1934. Dara Horn writes:

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Read more at Tablet

More about: Arts & Culture, Joseph Stalin, Shtetl, Soviet Jewry, Yiddish literature

 

If the U.S. Doesn’t Stand Firm, It Will Face an Empowered Iran with Nuclear Weapons

In Vienna this week, negotiations continue between Washington and Tehran over how to reinstate the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which aimed to restrict the Islamic Republic’s ability to develop the technology necessary for producing atomic bombs. Jacob Nagel and Mark Dubowitz explain the risks of a bad deal:

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Read more at Newsweek

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, U.S. Foreign policy