In Becoming a Jewish Novelist, Vasily Grossman Also Became a Great One

Between writing his first novel, Stalingrad, in the aftermath of World War II and his second, Life and Fate, after the death of Stalin, the great Soviet Jewish writer Vasily Grossman became utterly disillusioned with Communism—a transformation that, to Joseph Epstein, is part of what makes the former merely “an important book” and the latter “a masterpiece.” While part of this change in perspective was due to the revelations of Stalin’s crimes, Epstein writes that Grossman’s growing sensitivity to his own Jewish identity played a role as well:

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Read more at Commentary

More about: Anti-Semitism, Hannah Arendt, Holocaust, Jewish literature, Soviet Jewry, Vasily Grossman

When Confronting Terrorists, Lethal Force Is Often Necessary

On Saturday, a Palestinian terrorist stabbed a passerby in Jerusalem, and was then shot dead by two border guards. As the second bullet hit him when he was already on the ground, some Israelis have accused the guards of wrongdoing; a misleadingly edited viral video has also brought more attention to the incident. The editors of the Jerusalem Post comment:

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Read more at Jerusalem Post

More about: Israeli Security, Jerusalem, Knife intifada, Palestinian terror