In His Two Great Novels, Vasily Grossman Exposed the Similarities between Nazism and Communism, and Their Shared Consequences for the Jews

Sept. 27 2019

The Soviet-Jewish journalist and novelist Vasily Grossman is best known for his 1960 novel Life and Fate, an epic tale of World War II, the Holocaust, and Stalinism, which was “arrested” by the KGB and then smuggled out of the USSR in manuscript. It was not published until 1980, sixteen years after Grossman’s death, and then only in the West. But Life and Fate was in fact the sequel to a lesser known work, Stalingrad, which was published in censored form in 1954. Reviewing a new English translation of the latter book—based on uncensored manuscripts—along with a new biography of Grossman by Alexandra Popoff, Gary Saul Morson writes:

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Read more at New York Review of Books

More about: Anti-Semitism, Communism, Holocaust, Soviet Jewry, Vasily Grossman

With Its Threats against Israel, the EU Undermines International Law

The office of the European Union’s president, along with several member states, have made clear that they will consider taking punitive actions against Jerusalem should it go through with plans to extend its sovereignty over parts of the West Bank. In the assessment of EU diplomats, Israel has no legitimate claims to land outside the 1949 armistice lines—the so-called “1967 lines”—and any attempt to act as if it does violates the Fourth Geneva Convention. But, to David Wurmser, this entire argument is based on a poor reading of the law:

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Read more at National Review

More about: European Union, International Law, West Bank