Expressions of Support for Salman Rushdie Conceal Shaky Commitments to Freedom of Speech

Aug. 23 2022

After the near-fatal stabbing of the novelist Salman Rushdie—prompted by a religious edict issued by the Iranian government—there was an outpouring of sympathy, along with many declarations from the literary world about the sanctity of freedom of speech. But to the Anglo-American writer Lionel Shriver, these declarations tend to “fall sneakily flat.” She explains why:

When couched in generalities, defenses of free speech tend to come across as dreary and obvious. Only in the particular do these discussions get interesting. . . . Our we-shall-not-be-moved resolve is a self-flattering delusion. In truth, the nut jobs do push us around and have been doing so for years. The Anglosphere’s cowed acquiescence to Islamist bullies was vividly on display during the 2005 Danish cartoons hoo-ha. While numerous Continental newspapers defiantly republished those satirical depictions of Mohammad to demonstrate that they couldn’t be intimidated, mainstream print media in the UK, the U.S., and Canada refused to—thereby crippling articles about an essentially pictorial story.

Tact or fear? British newspapers especially have no reputation for tact, so let’s go for fear. These folks frighten the bejesus out of us, and we’ll do just about anything to keep from upsetting them. Terrorism works. Thus the . . . lesson most of my literary colleagues will derive from Rushdie’s hideous mutilation is: “avoid writing about Islam at all costs, and never step on Muslim toes.” Multiple writers and editors have already observed that The Satanic Verses, [the 1988 novel that earned Rushdie his fatwa], would never be published today. Rushdie himself might think better of writing it now. Contemporary publishing imposes a de-facto fatwa on criticism of Islam.

Besides, absent jihadists, we push one another around. The UK abandoned the principle of free expression the moment it brought in laws against “hate speech,” which in legal terms lies entirely in the eye of the beholder. Unsurprisingly, hate-speech laws have continued to expand, vigorously enforced by constabularies who find persecuting Twitter perps more rewardingly trendy, and less dangerous, than arresting armed burglars. Britain has formally elevated the non-right not to be offended over the real right to say what you like.

As many Muslims claim the book hurts their feelings, legally The Satanic Verses is hate speech [by the UK’s standards]. It’s a small step from there to the conclusion that last week Rushdie got what he had coming.

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Read more at Spectator

More about: Freedom of Speech, Iran, Literature, Radical Islam, United Kingdom

 

How European Fecklessness Encourages the Islamic Republic’s Assassination Campaign

In September, Cypriot police narrowly foiled a plot by an Iranian agent to murder five Jewish businessman. This was but one of roughly a dozen similar operations that Tehran has conducted in Europe since 2015—on both Israeli or Jewish and American targets—which have left three dead. Matthew Karnitschnig traces the use of assassination as a strategic tool to the very beginning of the Islamic Republic, and explains its appeal:

In the West, assassination remains a last resort (think Osama bin Laden); in authoritarian states, it’s the first (who can forget the 2017 assassination by nerve agent of Kim Jong-nam, the playboy half-brother of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, upon his arrival in Kuala Lumpur?). For rogue states, even if the murder plots are thwarted, the regimes still win by instilling fear in their enemies’ hearts and minds. That helps explain the recent frequency. Over the course of a few months last year, Iran undertook a flurry of attacks from Latin America to Africa.

Whether such operations succeed or not, the countries behind them can be sure of one thing: they won’t be made to pay for trying. Over the years, the Russian and Iranian regimes have eliminated countless dissidents, traitors, and assorted other enemies (real and perceived) on the streets of Paris, Berlin, and even Washington, often in broad daylight. Others have been quietly abducted and sent home, where they faced sham trials and were then hanged for treason.

While there’s no shortage of criticism in the West in the wake of these crimes, there are rarely real consequences. That’s especially true in Europe, where leaders have looked the other way in the face of a variety of abuses in the hopes of reviving a deal to rein in Tehran’s nuclear-weapons program and renewing business ties.

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Read more at Politico

More about: Europe, Iran, Israeli Security, Terrorism