Remembering the Holocaust in Serbia

March 4 2016

In 1995, when Serbia was still at war with its neighbors and engaged in the ethnic cleansing of Croats and Bosnian Muslims, its government established a memorial at the Staro Sajmište concentration camp in Belgrade, which had been established by the Nazis in 1942. The inscription notes that its “victims were mostly Serbs, Jews, and Roma,” although in fact the vast majority of those put to death there came from the latter two groups. As Liam Hoare writes, this detail reveals much about the way the Holocaust is remembered in Serbia—a country where many fought against the Nazis, but that also produced numerous collaborators:

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Read more at eJewish Philanthropy

More about: History & Ideas, Holocaust, Serbia, World War II, Yugoslavia

Iran Was Violating the Nuclear Deal Even before the U.S. Pulled Out

March 5 2021

In a formal report on Monday, the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), made clear—without saying it outright—that the Islamic Republic had deliberately misled the agency about its ongoing nuclear activities. Richard Goldberg explains what this means with regard to the White House’s hopes of reviving the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), as the 2015 agreement with Tehran is formally known:

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Read more at Dispatch

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, Nuclear proliferation, U.S. Foreign policy