The Rabbi, the Rebbetzin, and the Yiddish Poet

Aug. 24 2016

One of the foremost Yiddish poets in the decades following World War I, Peretz Markish was born in a Ukrainian shtetl, where his devout father worked as a teacher in a ḥeder. After leaving the Soviet Union in 1921, Markish returned eight years later, modifying his work somewhat to adhere to the party line and receiving accolades from a regime still interested in encouraging “proletarian” Jewish culture. At some point, he also crossed paths with Chana Schneerson (mother of the late Lubavitcher rebbe), whose husband was a prominent rabbi in the city of Dnepropetrovsk. Schneerson would later record the encounter in her memoirs, as Dovid Margolin writes:

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Read more at Chabad.org

More about: Chabad, History & Ideas, Peretz Markish, Soviet Jewry, USSR, Yiddish literature

Understanding Hizballah’s Sprawling South American Crime Syndicate

July 29 2021

Sunday marked the 27th anniversary of Hizballah’s bloody bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, which demonstrated to the world the long reach of the Lebanon-based terrorist group. But its presence in Latin America goes far beyond plotting attacks: located on the continent is the heart of its global criminal empire, which Hizballah uses to supplement the income it receives from its masters in Tehran. Emanuele Ottolenghi, drawing on detailed and extensive research, explains the inner workings of the group’s illicit operations, and its recent attempt to relocate networks disrupted by the U.S. and Europe to the tri-border area (TBA), where Paraguay, Argentina, and Brazil meet.

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Read more at BESA Center

More about: Crime, Drugs, Hizballah, Iran, Latin America