Why Religion and Liberalism Should Be Allies, Not Enemies

April 16 2018

In a wide-ranging defense of the liberal tradition broadly defined—that is, the various approaches to politics that see government as the protector of freedom and that are associated with such thinkers as John Locke, James Madison, and Edmund Burke—Peter Berkowitz addresses a few of the recent attacks on this tradition. Among these is the claim by some religious conservatives that liberalism is inherently corrosive to religion and even to virtue itself. To the contrary, argues Berkowitz: while freedom and virtue are always in tension, the best of liberal thought has always recognized the importance, if not the necessity, of religion for the wellbeing of a democratic polity. (Interview by William Kristol. Video, 25 minutes.)

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Read more at Conversations with Bill Kristol

More about: History & Ideas, John Locke, Liberalism, Political philosophy, Religion & Holidays

The American Association of University Professors Celebrates Anti-Semitism

Last week, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), an influential academic organization, announced that Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi of San Francisco State University would receive one of its annual awards, citing her “courage, persistence, political foresight, and concern for human rights . . . in her scholarship, teaching, [and] public advocacy” as well as her efforts to “advance the agenda for social change in Palestine, the United States, and internationally.” Those efforts, notes Jonathan Marks, include supporting the exclusion of the Jewish campus group Hillel from a university-wide event, and lambasting the school’s president for apologizing for that exclusion:

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Read more at Commentary

More about: Academia, Anti-Semitism, Israel on campus