What Archaeology Tells Us about King Hezekiah’s Religious Reforms

June 18 2018

In the second book of Kings, Hezekiah, who ruled during the late-8th and early-7th centuries BCE, is one of the few monarchs who comes off as a hero. He defended the kingdom of Judah against the Assyrian onslaught, listened to the words of the prophet Isaiah, and cracked down on idolatry and the bringing of sacrifices outside the Jerusalem Temple. David Rafael Moulis explains some of the archaeological evidence for these reforms:

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Read more at Bible History Daily

More about: Ancient Israel, Archaeology, Book of Kings, Hezekiah, History & Ideas, Idolatry

 

The Attack on the Colleyville Synagogue and the Battle of Narratives

Jan. 21 2022

In the aftermath of high-profile, violent incidents in the U.S., there is virtually always a national attempt to blame one or the other major political party. Dominic Green, considering the recent hostage-taking at a Colleyville, Texas synagogue, notes that while political discussions of this type may not matter much to the victims of any given attack, they have an invidious effect on our politics. For Jewish parents worried about whether to send their kids to school, he suggests,

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Read more at Wall Street Journal

More about: American Jewry, Anti-Semitism, U.S. Politics