The Japanese Diplomat Who Saved 6,000 Jews With His Handwriting

Oct. 23 2018

In 1939, the Japanese foreign ministry dispatched Chiune Sugihara to Lithuania to direct the consulate there. That same year, Jewish refugees from Nazi- and Soviet-occupied Poland began streaming into Lithuania desperate to escape Europe. Sugihara not only issued thousands of visas for them to travel to Japan, saving them from Hitler’s advance into the country in 1941, he also arranged for many to be settled temporarily in the Japanese city of Kobe. It’s worth noting that, of all the Jewish communities to fall under German control during World War II, Lithuanian Jewry had the lowest survival rate. David Wolpe, who recently participated at a ceremony in honor of Sugihara in Japan, comments:

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Read more at New York Times

More about: Chiune Sugihara, History & Ideas, Holocaust, Japan, Lithuania, Righteous Among the Nations

Understanding Hizballah’s Sprawling South American Crime Syndicate

July 29 2021

Sunday marked the 27th anniversary of Hizballah’s bloody bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, which demonstrated to the world the long reach of the Lebanon-based terrorist group. But its presence in Latin America goes far beyond plotting attacks: located on the continent is the heart of its global criminal empire, which Hizballah uses to supplement the income it receives from its masters in Tehran. Emanuele Ottolenghi, drawing on detailed and extensive research, explains the inner workings of the group’s illicit operations, and its recent attempt to relocate networks disrupted by the U.S. and Europe to the tri-border area (TBA), where Paraguay, Argentina, and Brazil meet.

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Read more at BESA Center

More about: Crime, Drugs, Hizballah, Iran, Latin America