The Soviet-Jewish Translator Who Wrote Publicly about the Holocaust—until Soviet Censorship Caught Up with Him

Oct. 25 2018

Even before World War II ended, the Soviet government was taking pains to suppress the memory of the Holocaust, eliding the persecution and slaughter of Jews under the general rubric of “fascist crimes.” Lev Ginzburg (1921-1980)—a Latvian-born Jew, professional translator of German poetry, prolific writer and essayist, and for many years chairman of the translators’ section of the Moscow Branch of the Union of Soviet Writers—was one of few Soviet-Jewish writers able to write openly about the subject, even receiving permission to travel abroad to investigate Nazi war crimes. Eventually, however, the Soviet authorities turned against him. The turning point came with his book Otherworldly Encounters, as Maxim Shrayer writes:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at Tablet

More about: History & Ideas, Holocaust, Jewish literature, Soviet Jewry

Qatar’s Unreported Donations to American Universities May Feed Campus Anti-Zionism

Feb. 25 2020

On February 12, the Department of Education announced that it suspects Harvard and Yale of failing to report millions of dollars received from China, Iran, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and elsewhere. The department has also accused several other schools of similar violations, and one professor has been arrested in the course of the investigation. Meanwhile, the Institute for the Study of Global Anti-Semitism and Policy has for years been researching Middle Eastern countries’ donations to American institutions of higher education, and believes there is a connection between these donations, especially those from Qatar, and campus anti-Semitism:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at ISGAP

More about: Anti-Semitism, Israel on campus, Qatar, University