The Absence of an Ancient Word for “Judaism” Doesn’t Mean There Was No Ancient Judaism

In his recent book Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion, Daniel Boyarin gives a historical account of the term “Judaism” and concludes that Jews had no word equivalent to it before the modern period. Boyarin therefore argues that, “from a linguistic point of view, only modern Judaism can be said to exist at all,” and that scholars who speak of ancient or medieval Judaism are engaging in an unscholarly anachronism. In her review, Adele Reinhartz writes:

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Read more at Marginalia

More about: ancient Judaism, Jewish history, Judaism

If the U.S. Doesn’t Stand Firm, It Will Face an Empowered Iran with Nuclear Weapons

In Vienna this week, negotiations continue between Washington and Tehran over how to reinstate the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which aimed to restrict the Islamic Republic’s ability to develop the technology necessary for producing atomic bombs. Jacob Nagel and Mark Dubowitz explain the risks of a bad deal:

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Read more at Newsweek

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, U.S. Foreign policy