A Stone-Age City Provides a Glimpse at the Land of Israel before the Time of Abraham

July 19 2019

Israeli archaeologists announced earlier this week their discovery of a 9,000-year-old settlement near Jerusalem, the largest found anywhere in the Levant to date. Citing Jacob Vardi, one of the excavation’s co-directors, Amanda Borschel-Dan writes:

“It’s a game changer, a site that will drastically shift what we know about the Neolithic era,” said Vardi. [Until now], “it was believed that the area of Judea was empty, and that sites of that size existed only on the other bank of the Jordan river, or in the northern Levant. Instead of an uninhabited area from that period, we have found a complex site, where varied economic means of subsistence existed,” [said] Vardi and co-director Hamoudi Khalaily.

Roughly half a kilometer from one end to the other, the site would have housed an estimated population of some 3,000 residents. . . . [T]he people who lived in this town had trade and cultural connections with widespread populations, including Anatolia, which is the origin of the obsidian artifacts discovered at the site. Other excavated material indicates intensive hunting, animal husbandry, and agriculture.

In addition to prehistoric tools such as thousands of arrowheads, axes, sickle blades, and knives, storage sheds containing large stores of legumes, especially lentils, were uncovered. . . . [A] number of small statues were [also] unearthed, including clay figurines of an ox and of a stone face.

Subscribe to Mosaic

Welcome to Mosaic

Subscribe now to get unlimited access to the best of Jewish thought and culture

Subscribe

Subscribe to Mosaic

Welcome to Mosaic

Subscribe now to get unlimited access to the best of Jewish thought and culture

Subscribe

Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Ancient Israel, Archaeology, Prehistory

Europe Must Stop Tolerating Iranian Operations on Its Soil

March 31 2023

Established in 2012 and maintaining branches in Europe, North America, and Iran, the Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Network claims its goal is merely to show “solidarity” for imprisoned Palestinians. The organization’s leader, however, has admitted to being a representative of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), a notorious terrorist group whose most recent accomplishments include murdering a seventeen-year-old girl. As Arsen Ostrovsky and Patricia Teitelbaum point out, Samidoun is just one example of how the European Union allows Iran-backed terrorists to operate in its midst:

The PFLP is a proxy of the Iranian regime, which provides the terror group with money, training, and weapons. Samidoun . . . has a branch in Tehran. It has even held events there, under the pretext of “cultural activity,” to elicit support for operations in Europe. Its leader, Khaled Barakat, is a regular on Iran’s state [channel] PressTV, calling for violence and lauding Iran’s involvement in the region. It is utterly incomprehensible, therefore, that the EU has not yet designated Samidoun a terror group.

According to the Council of the European Union, groups and/or individuals can be added to the EU terror list on the basis of “proposals submitted by member states based on a decision by a competent authority of a member state or a third country.” In this regard, there is already a standing designation by Israel of Samidoun as a terror group and a decision of a German court finding Barakat to be a senior PFLP operative.

Given the irrefutable axis-of-terror between Samidoun, PFLP, and the Iranian regime, the EU has a duty to put Samidoun and senior Samidoun leaders on the EU terror list. It should do this not as some favor to Israel, but because otherwise it continues to turn a blind eye to a group that presents a clear and present security threat to the European Union and EU citizens.

Subscribe to Mosaic

Welcome to Mosaic

Subscribe now to get unlimited access to the best of Jewish thought and culture

Subscribe

Subscribe to Mosaic

Welcome to Mosaic

Subscribe now to get unlimited access to the best of Jewish thought and culture

Subscribe

Read more at Newsweek

More about: European Union, Iran, Palestinian terror, PFLP