After Long Feigning Interest in Conversion to Judaism, a 17th-Century German Wrote a Notorious Anti-Semitic Tract

Aug. 15 2019

Born in the German city of Mannheim in 1654, Johann Andreas Eisenmenger spent nearly two decades studying the Talmud and other rabbinic texts with members of the Jewish community of Amsterdam, to whom he presented himself as a prospective convert. Then, in 1700, he published one of the best researched, and most influential, works of anti-Jewish slander. Henry Abramson writes:

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Read more at Jewish Telegraphic Agency

More about: Anti-Semitism, Christian Hebraists, Talmud

 

With Its Threats against Israel, the EU Undermines International Law

The office of the European Union’s president, along with several member states, have made clear that they will consider taking punitive actions against Jerusalem should it go through with plans to extend its sovereignty over parts of the West Bank. In the assessment of EU diplomats, Israel has no legitimate claims to land outside the 1949 armistice lines—the so-called “1967 lines”—and any attempt to act as if it does violates the Fourth Geneva Convention. But, to David Wurmser, this entire argument is based on a poor reading of the law:

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Read more at National Review

More about: European Union, International Law, West Bank