When the Ukrainian KGB Apologized for the Persecution of a Rabbi

Aug. 22 2019

In early August 1991—just a few weeks before the abortive coup that ultimately led to the Soviet Union’s collapse—a delegation of Chabad-Lubavitch rabbis arrived in Moscow, where they were told by the Ukrainian branch of the KGB that it wished to give them the arrest records of Rabbi Levi Yitzḥak Schneerson (1878-1944). Schneerson’s son, Menachem Mendel, was at the time of the visit the Lubavitcher rebbe; so the delegates traveled to Kiev to learn more. Dovid Margolin writes:

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Read more at Chabad.org

More about: Chabad, KGB, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, Soviet Jewry, Ukraine

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah