A Museum of Italian Jewish History Tells a Very Local Story

Feb. 17 2020

In 2018, the National Museum of Italian Judaism and the Shoah opened in the city of Ferrara, whose Jewish history is known to Americans primarily because of the 1971 film The Garden of the Finzi-Continis, based on Giorgio Bassani’s novel of the same name. Created pursuant to an act of the Italian parliament, the museum was the result of a nearly eighteen-year discussion of where and how to create a memorial to the Holocaust. The result is as much about the history of Ferrara’s Jews as about their fate under fascism. Carlin Romano writes:

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Read more at Moment

More about: Holocaust, Italian Jewry, Jewish museums, Renaissance

Exploring the Political Significance of the Seder Liturgy

April 6 2020

Besides being one of the most beloved of all Jewish texts, argues Meir Soloveichik, the Haggadah is also a foundational work of Jewish political philosophy. He explains why this is so—and much else about this deceptively simple work—in an eight-part audio course. Listen to the first lecture here, and click on the link below for the entire series. (Other options for download and streaming are also available.)

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Read more at Tikvah

More about: Haggadah, Jewish political tradition, Seder