The Failure of American Holocaust Education

For decades, the U.S. Jewish community has invested heavily in trying to raise awareness of the Shoah, and make its history part of Jewish and general educations. Non-Jewish educators and leaders have been largely receptive to these efforts, and often embraced them wholeheartedly. Yet, according to a new in-depth survey, 23 percent of American ages eighteen through thirty-nine think it possible or likely that the Holocaust didn’t happen, or has been greatly exaggerated. And 12 percent of respondents stated that either they were not aware of the Holocaust, or weren’t sure if they had ever learned about it. Even in New York state, the results are disheartening, writes Elizabeth Rosner:

Nearly 20 percent of [those surveyed] in New York believe Jews caused the Holocaust. . . . Additionally, 60 percent of respondents in New York do not know that 6 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust. A total of 34 percent of respondents in New York believe the Holocaust happened but the number of Jews who died has been greatly exaggerated or believe the Holocaust is a myth and did not happen or are unsure.

A shocking 28 percent of respondents in New York believe it is acceptable to hold neo-Nazi views, while 62 percent have never visited a Holocaust museum in the United States.

Read more at New York Post

More about: Education, Holocaust

Hizballah Is Learning Israel’s Weak Spots

On Tuesday, a Hizballah drone attack injured three people in northern Israel. The next day, another attack, targeting an IDF base, injured eighteen people, six of them seriously, in Arab al-Amshe, also in the north. This second attack involved the simultaneous use of drones carrying explosives and guided antitank missiles. In both cases, the defensive systems that performed so successfully last weekend failed to stop the drones and missiles. Ron Ben-Yishai has a straightforward explanation as to why: the Lebanon-backed terrorist group is getting better at evading Israel defenses. He explains the three basis systems used to pilot these unmanned aircraft, and their practical effects:

These systems allow drones to act similarly to fighter jets, using “dead zones”—areas not visible to radar or other optical detection—to approach targets. They fly low initially, then ascend just before crashing and detonating on the target. The terrain of southern Lebanon is particularly conducive to such attacks.

But this requires skills that the terror group has honed over months of fighting against Israel. The latest attacks involved a large drone capable of carrying over 50 kg (110 lbs.) of explosives. The terrorists have likely analyzed Israel’s alert and interception systems, recognizing that shooting down their drones requires early detection to allow sufficient time for launching interceptors.

The IDF tries to detect any incoming drones on its radar, as it had done prior to the war. Despite Hizballah’s learning curve, the IDF’s technological edge offers an advantage. However, the military must recognize that any measure it takes is quickly observed and analyzed, and even the most effective defenses can be incomplete. The terrain near the Lebanon-Israel border continues to pose a challenge, necessitating technological solutions and significant financial investment.

Read more at Ynet

More about: Hizballah, Iron Dome, Israeli Security