The Gentile Scholar Who Became the First Campus Rabbi

In 1759, Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Lifshuetz gave a Danish Protestant named Olaf Gerhard Tychsen a document certifying him as a ḥaver, or fellow—a sort of junior version of a rabbinic degree. This is likely the only case in history of traditional rabbinic ordination of any sort being granted to a non-Jew. Previously, Tychsen had studied under Jonathan Eybeschuetz, considered one of the foremost rabbis of his day. Edward Reichman shares some new research into Tychsen’s subsequent activities:

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Read more at Seforim

More about: Jewish-Christian relations, Rabbis

BDS, Unable to Harm Israel, Has Turned Its Sights on Jews in the Diaspora

Feb. 26 2021

March 15 marks the beginning of this year’s Israel Apartheid Week, during which campus groups around the world hold rallies and events for the purpose of defaming the Jewish state and mustering support for the movement to boycott, divest from, and sanction it (BDS). Richard Kemp comments:

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Read more at Gatestone

More about: Anti-Semitism, BDS