How a Soviet Jewish Historian Survived Purges and Repression—and Discovered Jewish Cossacks

June 25 2021

Born in Odessa in 1903, Saul Borovoi lived in the Soviet Union from its founding in 1917 until his death, two years before its collapse, in 1989. While the Communist regime strictly circumscribed any sort of explicitly Jewish activity, Borovoi managed to devote much of his life to Jewish historical scholarship. Brian Horowitz tells his story:

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Read more at The Librarians

More about: Cossacks, Jewish history, Soviet Jewry, Ukrainian Jews

Why a Government Victory in Southwestern Syria Is Bad News for Israel

Sept. 17 2021

Last week, Russia negotiated a ceasefire between the Syrian government and rebel forces in the city of Daraa, where the initial protests that sparked the uprising against Bashar al-Assad began. The agreement ended a 75-day assault on the city, located near the country’s southwestern border, by Russian, Iranian, and Syrian forces. Jonathan Spyer explains the significance of these events:

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Read more at Jonathan Spyer

More about: Golan Heights, Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, Syrian civil war