The Jewish Naval Hero Who Donated New York’s Banished Thomas Jefferson Statue

Oct. 26 2021

Last week, a statue of Thomas Jefferson was removed from the council chamber in New York’s city hall, where it has stood since 1915. The statue is a painted plaster model used by the French sculptor Pierre-Jean David d’Angers when he created an identical bronze likeness, which now sits in the Capitol rotunda. In 1833, Uriah P. Levy commissioned the sculpture, and the next year brought both it and the model to the U.S. Jonathan Sarna tells the story of this Jewish naval veteran, who intended the statute “to serve as a symbol of religious liberty.”

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Read more at New York Times

More about: American Jewish History, Freedom of Religion, Jews in the military, Thomas Jefferson

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah