A Ninety-Eight-Year-Old Auschwitz Survivor Amasses a Huge TikTok Following with a Simple Message: The Holocaust Happened

Nearly a year ago, Lily Ebert and her great-grandson, Dov Forman, began a TikTok account for the purpose of sharing Ebert’s story of surviving the Holocaust. Hundreds of videos and many millions of views later, Jonathan Edwards writes, the two are expanding their mission:

Unlike her mother, brother and sister, Lily Ebert survived the death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau. After the camp was liberated, Ebert made a promise to herself: she would tell people what had happened there and, in doing so, change the world.

Now, at ninety-eight, Ebert is keeping that promise in a way no one could have imagined in 1945. . . . Since their inaugural video on February 9 last year, the two have posted more than 380 videos on the social-media app, drawing in 1.7 million followers and amassing some 25 million likes in the process. Success on TikTok led to a book they’ve co-authored—Lily’s Promise—which is due out in May. Prince Charles wrote a foreword for the book.

Ebert’s TikTok campaign comes as anti-Semitism resurges across the United States. Anti-Semitic incidents—harassment, assault, and vandalism—have spiked 60 percent in the past five years, reaching near-record levels, according to the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism. Those have been punctuated by high-profile events like the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville and synagogue shootings in Pittsburgh in 2018 and outside San Diego in 2019.

Ebert said the rise of anti-Semitism and Holocaust denial makes talking about the atrocities all the more important.

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: Holocaust, Holocaust survivors, Social media

The Attempted Murder of Salman Rushdie Should Render the New Iran Deal Dead in the Water

Aug. 15 2022

On Friday, the Indian-born, Anglo-American novelist Salman Rushdie was repeatedly stabbed and severely wounded while giving a public lecture in western New York. Reports have since emerged—although as yet unverified—that the would-be assassin had been in contact with agents of Iran, whose supreme leaders have repeatedly called on Muslims to murder Rushdie. Meanwhile U.S. and European diplomats are trying to restore the 2015 nuclear agreement with Tehran. Stephen Daisley comments:

Salman Rushdie’s would-be assassin might have been a lone wolf. He might have had no contact with military or intelligence figures. He might never even have set foot in Tehran. But be in no doubt: he acted, in effect, as an agent of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Under the terms of the fatwa issued by Ayatollah Khomeini in February 1989, Rushdie “and all those involved in [his novel The Satanic Verses’s] publication who were aware of its content, are sentenced to death.” Khomeini urged “brave Muslims to kill them quickly wherever they find them so that no one ever again would dare to insult the sanctities of Muslims,” adding: “anyone killed while trying to execute Rushdie would, God willing, be a martyr.”

An American citizen has been the victim of an attempted assassination on American soil by, it appears, another American after decades of the Iranian supreme leader agitating for his murder. No country that is serious about its national security, to say nothing of its national self-worth, can pretend this is some everyday stabbing with no broader political implications.

Those implications relate not only to the attack on Rushdie. . . . In July, a man armed with an AK-47 was arrested outside the Brooklyn home of Masih Alinejad, an Iranian dissident who was also the intended target of an abduction plot last year orchestrated by an Iranian intelligence agent. The cumulative weight of these outrages should render the new Iran deal dead in the water.

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Read more at Spectator

More about: Freedom of Speech, Iran, U.S. Foreign policy