How to Understand the Charges against Benjamin Netanyahu

March 4 2019

Last week, the Israeli attorney general, Avichai Mandelblit, announced his intention, pending a formal hearing, to indict Prime Minister Netanyahu for bribery and the vaguely defined crime of breach of public trust. The hearing will take place after the April 9 national election, in which the prime minister remains a front runner. At issue in two of the three charges is the accusation that Netanyahu offered favorable policies in exchange for positive coverage in the press. Avi Bell argues that Mandelblit’s case rests on seriously stretching the definition of the crimes in question:

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Read more at Tablet

More about: Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel & Zionism, Israeli politics

The U.S. Has Managed to Force a Stalemate in the Syrian Civil War, at Least for Now

In a little remarked-upon statement in May, James Jeffrey, the State Department’s envoy for Syria policy, said that his goal was to turn the war-torn country into “a quagmire for the Russians.” By using economic leverage, this policy has achieved modest success, writes Jonathan Spyer:

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Read more at Foreign Policy

More about: Bashar al-Assad, Russia, Syrian civil war, U.S. Foreign policy