An Upcoming Summit in Bahrain May Not Be a Harbinger of Peace but Is Nonetheless a Welcome Sign

At an economic conference in the Bahraini capital of Manama taking place on June 25 and 26, the White House intends to roll out the first half of its much-anticipated plan for resolving the Israel-Palestinian conflict. Palestinian officials have already announced that they will not attend. While it would be foolish to pin high hopes on the conference, writes Raphael Ahren, it would likewise be wrong to dismiss its significance:

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Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Bahrain, Israel-Arab relations, Peace Process

The U.S. Has Managed to Force a Stalemate in the Syrian Civil War, at Least for Now

In a little remarked-upon statement in May, James Jeffrey, the State Department’s envoy for Syria policy, said that his goal was to turn the war-torn country into “a quagmire for the Russians.” By using economic leverage, this policy has achieved modest success, writes Jonathan Spyer:

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Read more at Foreign Policy

More about: Bashar al-Assad, Russia, Syrian civil war, U.S. Foreign policy