Mapping Divided Jerusalem

In honor of Jerusalem Day—which falls this Sunday, and celebrates the reunification of the city in 1967—the National Library of Israel has made available historic Israeli and Jordanian maps from the years when the eastern parts of the city were occupied by Jordan. David Cohen describes some of the more notable examples. (Reproductions of the maps can be found at the link below.)

An Israeli tourist map of western Jerusalem from the late 1950s was oriented with east at the top, instead of a standard northward orientation. . . . In other maps, both sides of the city are presented in detail, with the boundary line highlighted in the middle. These maps were designed to present tourists with a full picture of the city, but adapted to the new political realities created following the cease-fire in November 1948.

A pictorial map of Jerusalem, issued by [the distinguished] Steimatzky publishing house in 1955, was printed with the dividing line crossing Jerusalem. This was not a new map of Jerusalem, but a re-publication of a map that was first published about a decade earlier. A Jordanian tourist map that was published in Jerusalem in 1952 also shows the entire city of Jerusalem, with the borderline crossing it. It marks the various parts of the city as “UN-controlled territories,” “Jewish-controlled territory,” and “no-man’s land.”

Get unlimited access to Mosaic: Subscribe now

Welcome to Mosaic

Register now to get two more stories FREE.

Register Now

Get unlimited access to Mosaic: Subscribe now

Welcome to Mosaic

Register now to get two more stories FREE.

Register Now

Read more at The Librarians

More about: Israeli history, Jerusalem, Jordan

Hamas’s Tactics of Attrition and Extortion Are Paying Off

Feb. 21 2020

In January, the Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh visited Iran after promising the Egyptian government that he would not. Cairo responded by cutting exports of cooking gas and tires to the Gaza Strip. Facing a possible domestic crisis, the terrorist group recently resumed sending balloon-borne explosives into Israel, and allowed other jihadists to fire rockets. The move succeeded, despite retaliatory strikes by the IDF, writes Elior Levy:

Sign up to read more.

You've read all your free articles for this month. Sign up now for unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture and politics.

Register Now

Sign up to read more.

You've read all your free articles for this month. Sign up now for unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture and politics.

Register Now

Read more at Ynet

More about: Egypt, Gaza Strip, Hamas, Ismail Haniyeh, Israeli Security